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11 Most Popular Help Center Articles of 2015

  • December 14, 2015
  • by Kimberly Faber

We have several articles detailing different aspects of investigation, explaining the limitations of private investigators, and helping individuals, companies, and corporations understand the value of private investigators. As the year comes to a close, we took a look at our most-read articles from the PInow Help Center.

Here are the 11 most-read Help Center articles of 2015.

1. How Much Does it Cost to Hire a Private Investigator?

If you are thinking of using the services of a private investigator, you may be wondering what the cost of hiring private investigators will be. Around the country, private investigator fees vary by location and type of services. For investigators with extensive experience and training, expect to pay higher fees. The numbers quoted in this article are estimated cost ranges based on average pricing offered by private investigators across the United States.

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2. What a Private Investigator Cannot Do

With so many myths associated with private investigators, there are a lot of misconceptions about what these professionals can legally do, but as private citizens, they have no more rights or privileges than the average citizen. Depending on the state, private investigators generally cannot. . .

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3. Signs of a Cheating Spouse

When you suspect infidelity in your relationship it can be difficult to determine whether or not your suspicions are valid and if so, what to do next. At PInow, we surveyed our network of trusted infidelity investigators to find out what, in their experience, are the common indications of infidelity in a relationship. The following graphic displays the six major signs of a cheating spouse, what to expect in an infidelity investigation and other statistics on infidelity and marriage.

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4. How to Find Birth Parents Using a Private Investigator

There are a number of reasons why adopted individuals desire to search for their birth parents. Of the more common ones are to obtain general family information such as names and locations, to uncover familial traits and personalities, to obtain medical information such as genetic conditions which may impact the seekers health, and to understand the circumstances of the adoption. Recently, there has been an increasing trend for birth parents to search for their adult children given up for adoption years ago as well as by adoptive parents looking to get information about their adopted children. Information from the Child Welfare Information Gateway (www.childwelfare.gov) suggests that nearly half of all adoptive persons will search for their birth parents at some point during their lives.

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5. What is a Private Investigator?

A private investigator (who can also be known as a PI, private eye, or private detective) is a professional who is hired by law firms, corporations, insurance agencies, private individuals, or other entities to gather intelligence and confirm or disprove information. Professional private investigators often have law enforcement backgrounds or other relevant experience and training that has prepared them to investigate and research.

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6. How a Private Investigator Can Help With a Fraudulent Workers Compensation Claim

Workers compensation claims are intended for the benefit of employees who get injured while on the job. The compensation pays for lost wages, medical expenses and other expenses while the employee recovers from the injury. Recently there has been an increase in worker compensation claims and many of them are considered to be fraud or illegitimate. Since worker compensation claims are hardly disapproved by the employer, it has become an easy way to use fraudulent compensation claims for personal profit.

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7. How To Hire A Private Investigator

There are more than 40,000 private investigators working in the United States, and many of them specialize in different investigation types. This means that you have many options and that you should do a bit of homework before hiring an investigator. When hiring a private investigator, you want to find one who is experienced in the investigation type you need and who has all necessary licenses, credentials and qualifications. Below, you'll find a to-do list of items to help you find and hire the right investigator for you.

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8. When Should a Polygraph be Used?

Polygraph testing is used by many companies. Understanding where and when to use polygraphs is a must for any business looking for answers. People lie all the time, and as law enforcement officials have known for a long time, when people lie, they often show it in some way. When being dishonest, some people avoid eye contact, others fidget, and others break into a sweat. Polygraph tests take this basic concept and create a measurable way of recording people's reactions to questions. A polygraph tests respiration, blood pressure, heart rate, and skin conductivity while the subject is being asked specific questions. By comparing the bodys response to specific questions, polygraph examiners can verify the truthfulness of what a subject is saying.

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9. Questions to Ask a Private Investigator before Hiring Them

When it comes to hiring a private investigator, there are many questions that need to be covered in order to ensure that your final results are met. The most common misconception about private investigators is that they are all the same. The truth is that most private investigators specialize in very different things, and individually they offer a wide variety of services and market themselves accordingly.

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10. Gunshot Residue (GSR) and Testing

During our combined years at the medical examiner's office (spanning from late 2002 to late 2008), we collected GSR from every decedent with a cause of death due to a gunshot wound; every investigator did. However, the state laboratory had no longer accepted them for testing unless specific circumstances would warrant it. We cannot recall any submissions of GSR to the state lab. Instead it was recommended to collect DNA swabs from the decedent, firearm and other relevant evidence. Dean wrote the procedure that remains in place today.

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11. Gunshot Residue (GSR) and Testing

During our combined years at the medical examiner's office (spanning from late 2002 to late 2008), we collected GSR from every decedent with a cause of death due to a gunshot wound; every investigator did. However, the state laboratory had no longer accepted them for testing unless specific circumstances would warrant it. We cannot recall any submissions of GSR to the state lab. Instead it was recommended to collect DNA swabs from the decedent, firearm and other relevant evidence. Dean wrote the procedure that remains in place today.

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